Welcome to Tata Consultancy Services’ rolling coverage of the World Economic Forum Annual Meeting.

Smart Economy 

On a panel about the future of the economy, Tata Sons Chairman, N. Chandrasekaran, talks about his vision to give technology and artificial intelligence tools to everyone.

Giving AI tools to everyone will help people in India find jobs and will help connect people in remote locations in the country with the services they needs, he said.

AI is not only for software engineers.

Teaching digital skills to kids is much easier than teaching them reading and writing. We have to remove this myth around technology.

The event is being streamed live. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here.

[1233 CET, Wednesday 22 January]

Building the Digital-First Global Economy

Next up, Tata Sons Chairman, N. Chandrasekaran, is speaking on a panel at an event hosted by Bloomberg Live and Ericsson on the future economy. The panel will explore the best way to harness digitalization and technologies like 5G, the Internet of Things and artificial intelligence to create a more inclusive future and what the roles of the public and private sector are.

The event is being streamed live. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here.

[1215 CET, Wednesday 22 January]

Purpose and Tata Consultancy Services: Brand Finance

The session was rounded off with some comments from David Haigh, the chief executive of Brand Finance Plc, about TCS and it’s brand, mission and purpose.

Tata is an extremely purpose-driven organisation who, for over a century, has done the right thing and manages by consensus.

Long before anyone else was doing it, Tata were doing it.

His comments concluded the interesting panel session on the Brand Finance report. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here.

[1140 CET, Wednesday 22 January]

Employees as Ambassadors: Brand Finance

Getting your employees to belief in your purpose and be ambassadors is one of the most effective ways to embrace purpose, said Becky Frankiewicz, the chief executive of North America for Manpower Group.

Adif Zulkifli, the chief executive for Upstream, Petronas said:

You have got to have a purpose and the strategy to back it up.

Employees are at the forefront of that, they are your best investor and every interaction they have with your customers and stakeholders, they reflect what your company is. That’s very important.

That sentiment was echoed by Bernd Eitel, CCO & Brand Chief Officer, LafargeHolcim, who said it was important to conserve the pride in the company at every level.

[1137 CET, Wednesday 22 January]

Purpose & Being Genuine: Brand Finance

In a panel discussion, participants discussed how purpose and profit work together and the importance of being genuine.

Becky Frankiewicz, the chief executive for North America of Manpower Group said her company’s purpose and its profit were the same thing: helping people find meaningful work.

For Stella Medlicott, CMO, Ericsson, the purpose has to be genuine and the employees have to be on board.

If you are trying to put a message around that is not embedded in your organisation, you won’t get the commitment

If it is not true to who you are as a company, and you are just trying to follow the flow, then I think you are always going to struggle. But when it is core to your business, I think it flows naturally.

[1122 CET, Wednesday 22 January]

What is purpose for?

David Haigh, the chief executive of Brand Finance Plc introduces the report by asking what purpose is for, how it relates to brand, and showing how the value of several brands has grown over time.

 

Consistently achieving and promoting your purpose leads to a strong brand reputation, but only if it’s what stakeholders really want, and balancing the financial stakeholders with the other stakeholders

Amazon’s brand value has increased 18% over the past year, he says

By country, the US dominates the list, with more than 200 of the 500 brands. China is second, and likely to grow, Haigh says.

We are going to see more Chinese brands coming to the fore

By category, 14% of the table is tech brands, 13% is banking brands, 11% is retail, 8% telecom, 7% autos, 6% media, 5% oil and gas and 5% insurance.

[1048 CET, Wednesday 22 January]

Purpose & Profitability: Brand Finance & TCS

Amit Bajaj, CEO & Head of Europe, Tata Consultancy Services introduces the report, saying the association between TCS and Brand Finance is about exploring how investments in digital technology can impact brand valuation.

In a world that is increasingly disrupted by technology, faced with various societal challenges and people’s disposition towards it, in a world that is over communicating, the importance of creating a strong brand couldn’t be more relevant.

He said the theme of maximizing purpose and profitability is one that’s close to Tata Group and TCS.

For us, purpose and profitability are two sides of the same coin.

Purpose drives a good, a good purpose drives our employees to create profitability and the profitability channels back into the realisation of the purpose.

[1020 CET, Wednesday 22 January]

Brand Finance: Amazon retains title of world’s most valuable brand 

The initial results of Brand Finance’s Global 500 2020 report are in, and Amazon stays top of the list of most valuable brands for a third year.

Ferrari retains its pole position as the world’s strongest brand with a Brand Strength Index (BSI) score of 94.1 out of 100.

The disrupter of the entire retail ecosystem, the brand that boasts the highest brand value ever, Amazon continues to impress across imperishable consumer truths: value, convenience, and choice.

Today, Amazon’s situation seems more than comfortable, but what will the roaring twenties hold in store? says David Haig, the chief executive of Brand Finance

We’ll be following the presentation of the results live on this blog and the high level panel, featuring Amit Bajaj, CEO & Head of Europe, Tata Consultancy Services.

[1011 CET, Wednesday 22 January]

Good morning from Davos!

It’s Wednesday, and TCS have another busy day in store.

First up, Brand Finance release their Global 500 Brands 2020 report and Brand Guardianship Index 2020, which ranks the world’s top 100 CEOs. The details will be presented in the TCS Dome, before a discussion by a high-level panel. More detail on the panellists and agenda is available here.

Next up, the Executive Chairman of Tata Sons, Mr. N. Chandrasekaran, will participate in The Smart Economy 2020, an event jointly hosted by Ericsson and Bloomberg, to discuss the outlook for the changing technological, industrial and climatic landscape. More information on the event can be found here.

This evening, TCS will host its Global Reception in the Dome, bringing together more than 400 of the world’s foremost leaders from business, government, academia, media and civil society.

We will be following all the action on this live blog, to explore our dedicated website and find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here.

[0840 CET, Wednesday 22 January]

What’s coming up?

Tomorrow we’ll be back in the Dome as Brand Finance release their Global 500 Brands 2020 report and Brand Guardianship Index 2020, which ranks the world’s top 100 CEOs. Led by the CEO of Brand Finance, there will be a panel in which four global C-suite executives explore the pressures they face and how best to drive change.

More detail on the panelists and agenda is available here.

To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here.

[1915 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Building Connections: Bridgital Nation

That concludes a fascinating and wide-ranging debate on the Bridgital Nation book.

N. Chandrasekaran concluded by saying he grew up in rural parts of India and Bridgital Nation is, in part, trying to help overcome the difficulties people face in certain parts of the India, like basic access to hospitals, schools and other public services. For him, Bridgital is about answering the question:

How do you bring technology to be able to solve these problems?

Thanks for following along today, see you tomorrow for more TCS action at Davos.

To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here.

[1906 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Engaging Women: Bridgital Nation

The panel discussed gender divides in digital. Of the top engineers in the world only 3-5% are women, said Hayat Sindi, Senior Advisor to the President of the Islamic Development Bank for Science Technology and Innovation. More needs to be done to change women’s perception of tech and to engage women, she said.

This is changing. A lot of women want to design a platform to create in their own area, so they want to be an engineer, and that is starting to resonate with them.

We increased the percentage of women coming into AI from 20% to 58% this year in the Transform Fund, she said.

For more on the book, Bridgital Nation, click here.

[1858 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Real Examples: Bridgital Nation

N. Chandrasekaran gave a real example of how Bridgital Nation can help, the example of India’s huge shortage of doctors and nurses.

In one district with about 1.5 million people, a pilot Digital Nerve Centre was set up, manned by expert doctors and specialists, using a cloud infrastructure and other technologies. Then workers were recruited separately, who had tablets and went to villages to register people, who could them access the medical help without travelling to hospitals.

In this way, he said, jobs are created and the productivity of the experts is dramatically increased, because they can connect with patients digitally.

For more on the book, Bridgital Nation, click here.

[1848 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

The Right Skills: Bridgital Nation

It’s important to arm people with digital skills through education, as well as making sure that regulations are appropriate, said Dr. Rania Al-Mashat, Minister of International Cooperation, Arab Republic of Egypt.

This whole tension between are we creating jobs or are we crowding out jobs? I think it is inevitable. Now, nine in ten jobs require digital skills.

If we are to maintain a sustained growth rate, we need the private sector to be there.

For more on the book, Bridgital Nation, click here.

[1830 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Empowering People: Bridgital Nation 

Satya Nadella, chief executive of Microsoft said the most important element is working out how we put digital technology in the hands of people and empower them to build institutions.

In 2020 we think the world needs digital technology to drive the next level of productivity growth because the reality is, the world is not growing. At least not the way it was.

Every country does need to create that digital infrastructure and in particular broadband access so whether it is healthcare or whether it is education or the ability for a small business in that community to get productive, those are important things to do.

For more on the book, Bridgital Nation, click here.

[1817 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Creating Jobs: Bridgital Nation 

N. Chandrasekaran began by outlining the principles in his book, and why the concept of Bridgital is different from digital. For him, it must create jobs, be inclusive and bring everyone along with it.

It is about providing access but at the same time, empowering people with technology, with the skills to operate at a high level.

The book addresses India’s biggest challenges by bridging the chasm between rural and urban, illiteracy and education, aspirations and achievement.

For more on the book, Bridgital Nation, click here.

[1810 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Bridgital Nation

Back in the TCS Dome, we’re gearing up for the official launch and discussion of Mr. N. Chandrasekaran’s book, Bridgital Nation, Solving Technology’s People Problem.

The executive Chairman of Tata Sons argues that AI can generate jobs in emerging countries, instead of accepting technology as an inevitable replacement for human labour.

Get set for an exciting panel, including Satya Nadella, CEO, Microsoft, H.E. Dr. Rania Al-Mashat, Minister of International Cooperation, Arab Republic of Egypt, Carlos Brito, CEO, AB in Bev, Hayat Sindi, Senior Advisor to the President of the Islamic Development Bank for Science Technology and Innovation.

Skills are an important part of TCS’ work – read more about that here. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here.

[1750 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Skills of the Future

Rounding off a wide-ranging set of talks and panels about how the world can face its biggest challenges, Mohammad Abdulla Al Gergawi, Minister of Cabinet Affairs and the Future, UAE, addressed the Dome, making two announcements.

He said the Emirates will host Global Goal Live in Dubai in December in 2020.

And he announced a global coder initiative to teach 5 million people coding in underprivileged communities.

To eliminate poverty, we need to create jobs, we need to empower society.

We need to create companies for people to help their society and their families.

The skills of the future are changing.

Our aim is to teach 5 million young people coding for them to create jobs, again to give them opportunities and to do their start-up companies.

Skills are an important part of TCS’ work – read more about that here. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here.

[1500 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Reimagining the World’s Biggest Challenges

Priyanka Chopra-Jones spoke about how everyone can move and shake and demand change, and how technology is enabling this, allowing people to talk directly to others, without having their voices moderated or edited.

A lot of people say, I’m just one person, what can I do? Each drop of water makes an ocean

I would love to get to a place where my children, when I have them, can grow up in a world where the world leaders have listened to Greta’s generation, where the world leaders have paid attention to that generation.

I want my kids to grow up in that world where the climate crisis is contained, if not averted. I want to be able to live in a place where a woman’s ability to succeed should be basic human right and not based on geography or chance. I guess that’s the world I would love.

To read more about the themes of Davos, click here. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here

[1500 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Give what you live

Chris Stadler, Managing Partner, CVC Capital Partners, and the chairman of the board of Global Citizen, said he wants to see the world’s billionaires giving more and giving faster.

The top 2200 wealthiest people on this planet are giving away 1% of their wealth and that is not enough, and it is not going to cut it.

He wants to see people giving 5% of their wealth away a year. Doing that would easily raise the money needed to meet the SDGs, he said.

It’s an urgent situation with respect to extreme poverty and climate change, and having the money sit in the bank isn’t going to do anybody any good.

To read more about the themes of Davos, click here. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here

[1432 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Reimagining Sustainability

The panel on sustainability featuring Alexander De Croo, Deputy Prime Minister of Belgium, Chuck Robbins, chairman and chief executive of Cisco and Gilbert Houngbo, President of the International Fund for Agricultural Development and the former Prime Minister of Togo, agreed that taking a grassroots approach is the key to success and engaging at a local level, as well as hard work to get the buy-in to create an opportunity for lasting change.

Anne Wawira Njiru, the founder of Food for Education an organisation that is feeding Africa’s future through innovative, cutting-edge technology, said involving local people in bringing change is key.

A lot of times, when we think about bringing change, we do it as a way that puts local people in isolation. You put them on a side-line and you say, “This is what you need to do,” versus, “What do you think we should do.”

Success will come from tapping in to potential, listening to those voices and creating space for the voices to be heard, she said.

To read more about the themes of Davos, click here. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here

[1420 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Reimagining Human Capital and Health

The panel on health discussed the funding gap that exists around the world and how organizations are filling that, but also how partnerships and coalitions can make a difference.

Thomas Zeltner, Special Envoy of the World Health Organization said that every individual counts. He said everyone has the potential to make a difference, even with small actions and real progress can be made by 2030 if action is taken.

Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala is Chair of the Board of Gavi, the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunisation said that there are some positives in healthcare, with vaccines becoming more accessible and affordable to children in developing countries. Gavi has helped immunize hundreds of millions of children.

This is an alliance that works, and we are saying that for the next period we want to do 300 million more children, save 7 to 8 million more lives and keep the health of the population and of the society and of the world going. Prevention is better than cure.

Seema Kumar, Vice President of Innovation, Global Health, and Policy Communication at Johnson & Johnson said the world has made progress in technology and innovation, but also needs to make progress in implementation and delivery.

One of the big goals for us at Johnson & Johnson is to really focus on the access piece and also the training of community healthcare workers who will be the critical linchpin towards getting our innovations to the last patient and the last mile.

To read more about the themes of Davos, click here. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here

[1420 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Global Goal Live

Back after lunch and Hugh Evans, Founder & CEO at Global Citizen and Declan Kelly, Chairman, CEO and co-founder of Teneo make the case for their Global Goal Live, which aims to bring together governments, corporations, philanthropists and citizens to help end poverty.

https://www.globalcitizen.org

To read more about the themes of Davos, click here. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here

[1349 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Reimaging Capitalism

How capitalism is changing was the topic of this panel, moderated by Randall Lane, the editor and chief content officer at Forbes, with each of the speakers saying how companies treat their employees has become a concern for citizens.

Being able to measure that accurately is key, according to Alison Omens, chief strategy officer at JUST Capital. People want to know companies treat their workers well and behave ethically, she said. JUST Capital tracks companies’ policies and targets to see where they are on their corporate journey.

The first step is transparency, the next step is then assessment and being held accountable, and looking at not just policies, but performance.

There’s been a huge shift over the past decade, with employees asking much more, as are shareholders and other stakeholders, said Hans Vestberg, chairman and chief executive officer of Verizon Communications.

It really excites your employees, definitely, your customers, that you are standing up for the right things, and ultimately shareholders are seeing the impact of it.

It’s a never-ending journey, you need constantly to connect with your employees because ultimately, they are the biggest asset.

A different type of capitalism is also better for the bottom line, according to Paul Tudor Jones, founder of Tudor Investment Corporation and Robin Hood Foundation. In the US, companies that embrace this create jobs at a faster rate, give more to communities and are much more likely to be environmentally sustainable, as well as having a higher return on equity.

If you listen to what the public says, and by being resonant with them, the pie actually grows for you.

To read more about the themes of Davos, click here. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here

[1224 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Imaginative Ideas

Krishnan Ramanujam, President, Business & Technology Services at Tata Consultancy Services, talked about Business 4.0, and how the concepts that help corporates prepare for the future can also address issues in society. These include leveraging of ecosystems and harnessing of abundance.

He gave examples of where differences are already being made, for example in healthcare and in conservation, both areas that have benefitted from better connectivity and availability of data.

The harnessing and leveraging of ecosystems can be just as powerful in helping solve global issues of societal significance as they are in solving issues at a board level for a business.

To read more about leveraging ecosystems click here. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here

[1149 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Governments harnessing technology

Claire Melamed, chief executive of the Global Partnership for Sustainable Development Data, said that governments need to shore up the trust and think of innovative ways to lead in the age of digital technology and data. They also need to cooperate with each other to achieve the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals, she said.

People don’t trust governments. They don’t trust the media. And they’re fearful of the future. And I think this poses a real challenge for governments.

If we’re going to live and thrive together, we need to find ways to cooperate and trust each other and work well together as individuals.

Technology is changing the balance of interests and the relationships that we have in our society. And there are two ways that this can go. And we’re seeing both playing out in front of us in the world today. Technology can enter into the cracks of our societies and increase inequalities, increase tensions, increase the dangers that we face. But equally, technology can build bridges that can help us to overcome these cracks, to strengthen our societies.

Tomicah Tillemann, co-founder and director of the Blockchain Trust Accelerator at New America and Jeffrey Saviano, EY Global Tax Innovation Leader said a range of organizations need to work together to help advance the Sustainable Development Goals. Eradicating just 1% of tax fraud around the world would generate billions of dollars of funding to help achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, they said.

To read more about the speakers, click here. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here

[1109 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Education and technology

The importance of life-long learning, reskilling and how “soft skills” are becoming more important than “hard skills” was a focus for panellists in this round of the discussion, including Daniela Rus, a professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science and director of the Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory at MIT:

It’s not enough to invest just in education – we also have to invest in re-skilling the current workforce.

And as we think about what to teach in the re-skilling programs, it’s important to consider teaching how to use existing tools, but also to focus on what people are good at and machines are not.

Computer scientist Nuria Oliver underlined the importance of attracting and retaining the best tech talent in Europe, counteracting a brain drain that sees many people leave to work in the US or in China.

Gordana Landen, Group CHRO & Member of Group Executive Committee at Adecco Group AG talked about apprenticeships and how they can help reskilling the millions of people that need training and ensure that no one is left behind.

The only way to make sure that we prepare ourselves for the future is to really make sure that we upskill and reskill our people to be able to meet the future demand.

To read more about the speakers, click here. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here

[1015 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Technology and Finance

Two speakers took the stage to talk about the importance of ecosystems in funding future projects and how technology can help.

Nicole d’Avis, managing director of Berkeley’s Institute for Creative Entrepreneurship and leader of the Open Music Initiative, a 300+ music industry member consortium focused on streamlining metadata and payment tracking for artists, spoke about a new model for financing music.

We strongly believe that artists should be part of the conversation.

This is an ecosystem where data is portable, where artists have control and sovereignty over their identity, over their reputation.

This model can apply to many creative industries, she said, not only to music but also video, film, journalism and software. Charles Chang, who holds a PhD from Berkeley talked about innovative ways of financing large building projects, like high-speed railways or shopping malls. We need to think about how we can use ecosystem financing to solve the big problems that we have, he said.

To read more about the speakers, click here. To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here

[1015 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Views from the Dome

Here’s a view of the Dome, the stunning snowy backdrop and the panellists debating leadership:

[1005 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Augmenting Decision Making

Vanessa Colella, chief innovation officer at Citi and head of Citi Ventures focused on how technologies can help humans make better and more informed decisions. She said that as well as focusing on artificial intelligence, or mimicking human decision-making, people should equally be focused on artificial enlightenment – augmenting decision-making.

We know that there are so many communities around the world that require investment in order to move forward. It’s very difficult to get information on a granular level about what those communities need. Do they need help getting out of a food desert? Is it more about affordable housing? Is it really about youth services?

Examples of how tech can help decision-making already exist, for example in the midst of one of the biggest monsoons in India, that killed 400 people and left 1 million more displaced, tech was able to help give rescuers very localised information about the terrain and the whereabouts of people, and thus enabled them to save almost 100 additional people.

It’s about figuring out how to use those same tools around data capture, around compute power and speed, to help humans leverage what we have in order to make better decisions, she said.

To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here

[0940 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Reimagining Leadership

A panel on leadership in the future featured Julie Bishop, former Australian Minister for Foreign Affairs, Bas Burger, chief executive of BT Global Services, Rick Haythornthwaite, chairman of Mastercard, and NG Subramaniam, chief operating officer & executive director at TCS.

They discussed how leadership needs to evolve as technology takes hold and about how it’s important to foster the right skills, while reassuring people who are worried their jobs may disappear.

Bas Burger said enabling people to trust the technology was the most important thing and NG Subramaniam said it’s about creating a positive impact and making sure that technology makes people feel good about their lives and helps them create a better quality of life.

All the panellist agreed that training and reskilling will be a key part of leadership as we move in to the future.

To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here

[0929 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Bringing Technology to Life

Rajesh Gopinathan, chief executive and managing director at Tata Consultancy Services says he’s looking forward to the discussions, which he hopes will spark debates that can continue over the coming year.

TCS has been built on a mission of making technology work for enterprises or governments and for society.

It is one thing to develop good tech, it’s another thing to know what has to be done with it. And it’s a third thing to actually get it to work and to deal with the real-world problems of making it work.

To find out more about what TCS is doing at Davos, click here

[0849 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Imagination in Action Kicks Off

John Werner, managing director at Link Ventures and a fellow at MIT Connection Science welcomes delegates to Imagination in Action and says he’s looking forward to the talks about how we can get better at connecting biology, humans and technology.

“It’s a great group of people,” he says. “In addition to hearing speakers up here, we’re really proud of the tech demos back here.”

Werner also thanks TCS for its support of the event and for hosting it in the TCS Dome at Davos. We’ll be following all the action here on this blog, so stay tuned, and you can see the full list of inspiring speakers here.

[0842 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

Welcome to TCS’ Tuesday at Davos

Welcome, you’re joining us for an action-packed day at the World Economic Forum’s Annual Meeting in Davos.

First off, we’re hosting Imagination in Action – a series of fast 2-5 minute talks exploring the potential of Artificial Intelligence, the Internet of things and Data Analytics.

Later today Mr. N. Chandrasekaran, the executive Chairman of Tata Sons, will launch his book Bridgital Nation, debating how technology can be a force for good alongside Satya Nadella, the chief executive of Microsoft, Dr. Rania Al-Mashat, Minister of International Cooperation, Arab Republic of Egypt, Carlos Brito, the chief executive of AB in Bev and Hayat Sindi, Senior Advisor to the President of the Islamic Development Bank for Science Technology and Innovation

Stay tuned here for live updates from Imagination in Action. For full look at the TCS agenda, click here

[0805 CET, Tuesday 21 January]

What’s TCS doing at Davos?

TCS joins chief executives and chairs of other companies, as well as political leaders, technology pioneers, academics, leaders of NGOs and other stakeholders to discuss some of the biggest issues we face – from environmental challenges to the technological trends that are reshaping our lives.

They’ll also debate the changing role of companies in society and how best to manage and measure it. For full look at the TCS agenda, click here

On Tuesday, TCS, the MIT Connection Science and Forbes will gather thinkers and innovators for a series of “TED style” presentations exchanging perspectives on how best to use technology to unleash the collective intelligence of humanity. For more on the agenda and speakers, please visit: www.imaginationinaction.xyz

Also on Tuesday, Mr. N. Chandrasekaran, the executive Chairman of Tata Sons, will launch his book Bridgital Nation, which presents a vision for the future where technology and human beings coexist in a mutually beneficial ecosystem. He’ll debate how technology can be a force for good alongside Satya Nadella, the chief executive of Microsoft, Dr. Rania Al-Mashat, Minister of International Cooperation, Arab Republic of Egypt, Carlos Brito, the chief exeutive of AB in Bev and Hayat Sindi, Senior Advisor to the President of the Islamic Development Bank for Science Technology and Innovation.

[1440 CET, Monday 20 January]

Welcome to Davos 2020 

Hello and welcome to Tata Consultancy Services’ (TCS) rolling coverage of the World Economic Forum (WEF) Annual Meeting.

As a Strategic Partner we’re engaging in and supporting causes and platforms that help businesses thrive, while also striving to build a stronger, collaborative and sustainable future for our planet.

For more information about what we’re doing, visit our dedicated website: https://www.tcs.com/davos

And stay tuned to this blog for more live news from our key events.

[1338 CET, Monday 20 January]